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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 14
WHUT (Howard University Television) 6
KRCB (PBS) 4
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is britain is open for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k.
a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the leadership of no nation would ever, ever bargain initiate an action that assured their own destruction? >> well, one thing about the iranian leaders that they have in common with the leaders of terrorist groups like bin laden, they are not strapping on the suicide bombs, they are very willing to see young people and handicapped people and so on strap these things on, but their lives mean a lot to them, and that is something in our hip pocket it seems to me. they want to stay alive and they want to stay in power. >> rose: i want to talk about that. one quick question about what you believe with respect to iran. you believe that an attack by rael will be a terrible thing to happen, because it would only delay the inevi
distance. >> and i saw soviet union falling apart. i saw russia being totally young country trying to build democracy but also trying to save whatever national wealth was there. it was very difficult to understand. was it just gas, oil, was it rivers and forests, was it a vast, vast country, huge territory but also culture. i represent maybe not such a group of people which talks every day but it was a group of people which always reminded everyone that use your culture, it may be biggest loss you have. of course national resources always, people talk, oh, energy, of course, important important today for everyone in the world. what about culture? we think it's always important to have both. >> yeah and your responsibility is for its culture. >> i do my best and i perform quite often. >> so is your friend vladimir putin responsive to that? >> i think he supports. first of all i done see him often maybe three, four times a year, i have known him for 20 year, long before he was a president. >> in saints petersburg of course. i was rather nonman already then because i lead such an institution.
, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. and union bank.
society, skeptical about the soviet union and so on, and serena is sent down to coax a young novelist to see if he would like to give up his teaching job and have a yearly stipend from this art foundation which is a front organization, and this being a spy novel they have to fall in love so that is really -- at least that is the setup. >> rose: why are novelists attracted to spy novels? >> well, maybe all forms are spy novels, and maybe all novelists are spies on people -- >> rose: mirrors on top of mirrors on top of mirrors? >> well we watch. >> we try to gauge motivations, we try to do that thing that all intelligence agencies do which is take control of the narrative, so in that sense, we understand the spy novel, it is maybe the, it is the fiction of our crass and i guess for english writers, i don't know about american writers, the center of this sits canny old john -- >> who you think will be judged simply as a literary figure. >> i think it is now happening, lots of .. my writer friend think tinker taylor, soldier spy is one of the key postwar forms, the great novel that charts
, and union bank. >> at union bank,
that the relationships in general between unions and business and things like that have all progressed over time and the work force is very productive. so there's no reason why the manufacturing base shouldn't be higher in the future and we should make that a goal? you know? in other words, this notion -- this darwinian notion that the u.s. was going to go from farms to manufacturing to service, we were the only guys reading those books, you know? the chinese had a book that said "don't read the american book. it doesn't work." >> rose: and don't read the russian book. >> so i think we can do a better job with manufacturing. i think it's quite important and it's one of the ways you create good middle-class jobs. >> rose: where the the jobs coming from? >> i think energy can provide a ton of jobs. i think housing is getting better everyday. so you're going to get some more jobs there. and i think export markets are going to continue to be pretty robust and the u.s. can play in those places. so in the short term that's where some of the jobs are going to be. but we're going to need more to get une
wanted to go to broadway but because of the union issues between london and america, i wasn't a name of any type. so they wouldn't allow me in. and then x-men hit. and because that hit, all of a sudden they said oh, well now are you a name and you can come. but i was contracted for the sequel so i couldn't go. >> i just need to confirm that your broadway debut was then boy from oz. >> yes, you established yourself as a musical ledge enwith your broadway debut. i'm just confirming that. >> rose: just being mean. >> no, because he just said something very nice about me so i had to point out that hugh jackman is being modest yet again. >> we're going outcompliment each other. we get very aggressive. >> we're aggressive complimenters. >> rose: did you have a single bit of trepidation about doing this. >> oh, yes, of course. >> rose: what? you knew you could sing. >> no, no all-- . >> rose: you knew that was a powerful moment with this extraordinary song is going to be delivered by you which is what, 25% into the movie. >> it is sort of the end of the first act. >> there were so many ways
statements. that's his statement on slavery. what's going to be his next union raw, the next statement. >> rose: but you have no idea what it is? >> right now i'm not sure. >> rose: and how will you find it? >> i have to say i usually find it through other writing. . >> rose: hoping it will lead you to thinking i want to go here. >> i really like doing filmwriting. and i haven't punished -- >> rose: film writing? these are esize filmes, not criticism? >> it's kind of criticism/eseye, usually about the director so i don't get in trouble and be sheepish with someone at the parent because i wrote bad stuff about them but it's unfair to take a swipe at a colleague. i'm a critic, i'm a critic. if i'm not, i'm not. but i love that type of writing because i love being the student of cinema all the time and dealing with it and constantly putting my aesthetices, what i consider good work, very bad work, constandpointly under a microscope and being forced to describe it. in this case in particular, it was that writing that led me to the story. and one of the things that was great about it, becau
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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